GMAT Test Prep Courses.

HABIB INTERNATIONAL
Spreading Fragrances & Knowledge

About us Contact Site Map Home
GMAT Test Prep Courses
  Health & Beauty
  Automobiles
  Books
  Business
  Computer & Internet
  Education
  Electronics
  Arts & Entertainment
  Fashion
  Food & Drinks
  Household
  Personal Finance
  Shopping & Gifts
  Sports
  Travel & Vacation
  Other Articles
 
 

GMAT Test Prep Courses

 

The GMAT Prep Pitfalls
HERE YOU'LL FIND the most common mistakes that people make when getting ready for the GMAT. Avoid these pitfalls—or you might find yourself matriculating at your last-choice B-school instead of your first choice one!
1. Overconfidence about test-taking abilities
Perhaps your college GPA approached 4.0, or perhaps you "aced" the SAT back in high school. Even if so, don't assume that you can stroll into the GMAT testing center and crush the competition. Think again. Be forewarned: There are many test-smart MBA candidates out there who are taking the GMAT very, very seriously. And so should you.
2. Too much emphasis on certain testing areas at the expense of others
In gearing up for the GMAT some test-takers will focus on strengths at the expense of weaknesses, while others will hammer away at their weak areas while neglecting their strong areas. Both approaches are dangerous. Remember: Your GMAT CAT score is based not only on how many questions you answer correctly and their difficulty level, but also on the range of question types and specific abilities covered by those questions. Be equally diligent in preparing for all sections of the exam. Also keep in mind that each B-school has its own formula for weighing your various GMAT scores. Keep your options open by performing your best on every section and every question type within each section.
3. Undue emphasis on practice-test scores
Perhaps you have a particular business school in mind as your first choice, and you think that you need a particular GMAT score to gain admission to that school. Setting a goal for your GMAT scores is understandable. But try not to concern yourself as much with your scores as with what you can constructively do between now and exam day to improve your performance.
4. GMAT burnout (over-preparation)
Preparing for the GMAT is a bit like training for an athletic event. You need to familiarize yourself with the event, learn to be comfortable with it, and build up your endurance. At some point—hopefully around exam day—your motivation, interest, and performance will peak. Sure, it takes some time and effort to get comfortable with the exam, to correct poor test-taking habits, to develop an instinct for recognizing wrong-answer choices and to find your optimal pace. But there's a point beyond which additional study and practice confer little or no additional benefit. Don't drag out the process by starting several months in advance or by postponing the exam to give yourself more time than you really need for preparation.
5. Unrealistic expectations
You'd love "perfect" GMAT scores, wouldn't you? And in theory, your capable of attaining them. But in reality, you're constrained by your innate abilities. Accept your limitations. With conscientious study and practice, you'll perform as well as you can reasonably expect. Also, be realistic about the benefits you can expect from my Website—or from any GMAT book or course. There's only so much that you can do in 24 hours—or even 240 hours—to boost your GMAT score.
6. Not taking the GMAT essays seriously enough
Although the B-schools clearly state their admissions policies regarding GMAT Quantitative, Verbal, and Total scores, they're a lot hazier about their requirements for GMAT essay scores. Does this mean that you shouldn't take the GMAT essay sections seriously? No! Look at it this way: The highest-ranked B-school you can get into is one at which you're a borderline candidate, right? And it's borderline candidates who are going to receive closest scrutiny—and that means a close look at GMAT essay scores. Enough said?
7. Insufficient practice under exam conditions
It's particularly crucial that you simulate testing conditions for the two Analytical Writing sections. Use a word processor, restrict yourself to the features available on the CAT word processor, and force yourself to adhere to the 30-minute time limit for each essay. Also, do NOT underestimate the role that endurance plays on the GMAT. Half the battle is just making it through the 3 hour ordeal with your wits intact.
8. Fatalistic thinking
Many test-takers tell themselves: "I'll give the GMAT one shot, and if I do poorly, I'll just forget the whole idea of an MBA program." Don't succumb to this sort of fatalistic, self-defeating thinking. If you have time and can afford it, you should register for and take the real GMAT once as a dress rehearsal—just to get comfortable with the testing environment. You'll get some of those butterflies out of your system, and if you're like most test-takers you'll be far more relaxed the second time around. In fact, ETS statistics show that among repeaters, more than 90% improve their score the second time around. Those are great odds!
9. Taking the GMAT too late to retake it
Most graduate business schools admit new students for the fall term only. Although application deadlines vary widely among the schools, if you plan to take the GMAT no later than December 15 prior to matriculation, you'll be sure to meet any school's application deadline. Ideally, you should take the GMAT early enough so that you can take the exam a second time if necessary and still meet application deadlines. In any event, take the GMAT at a time when you're not distracted by other pressures at your workplace or at school.
NOTE: If you want to repeat the exam, the testing service requires that you wait until the next calendar month; so plan accordingly to avoid the time squeeze!
Recommended Reading : Arco 30 Days to the Gmat Cat (Arco Thirty Day Guides) by Mark Alan Stewart
Content Courtesy : www.west.net
GMAT™ is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council™.
Test names and other trademarks are the property of the respective trademark holders.
 

 

GMAT Test Prep Courses.